Fly The Wing
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MORE - Quick Quiz Answers
 
January 2012
YOU LEAVE GILLESPIE, ALTIMETER SETTING 30.12, FLYING EAST THROUGH THE DESERT, INTO LOWER PRESSURE, 29.97... BEFORE CHANGING TO THE NEW/UPDATED SETTING, YOUR ALTIMETER IS INDICATING: 

A) 150’ higher than you actually are; 
B) 150’ lower than you actually are;
C) pressure altitude, corrected to 29.97; 
D) true altitude, above mean sea level.

A) 150’ higher than you actually are. For example, at the ‘old’ setting of 30.12, your altimeter may be reading 6,500’. But when you set it to the ‘new’ setting of 29.97, the altitude will now indicate about 6,350’, or 150’. Don’t let the wording between A) and B) confuse you; it’s the concept you need to grasp. As you fly into lower pressure, your (true or indicated) altitude decreases. You can confirm this on the ground, without even starting the engine. Replicate the example settings given in the question and note which way the altimeter moves! 

December 2011
Due to terrain, you're forced to land with a 7-10 knot tailwind. Regarding your final approach speed, should you fly it: 

A) 7-10 knots slower than normal to compensate for your increased groundspeed; 
B) Fly the same approach speed, but use your GPS' groundspeed, rather than the airspeed indicator;
C) Fly the same IAS you always fly;
D) I'm not sure; I'll look in the airplane's POH.

C) Fly the same indicated airspeed you always fly, and don’t be alarmed by how fast the ground is rushing under the plane (that’s merely your increased groundspeed with a tailwind!). D) is also a great answer; the POH will generally tell you how much more runway you’re going to need to land with a tailwind.

November 2011
In what flight condition is torque effect the greatest in a single-engine airplane? 

A) High airspeed, high power, high angle of attack.
B) Low airspeed, high power, high angle of attack.
C) Low airspeed, low power, low angle of attack. 
High airspeed, low power, low angle of attack.

B) Low airspeed, which requires a high angle of attack with high power. Try it next time you climb out at VX and see how much right rudder you need just to keep the inclinometer ball centered!

October 2011
When flying at 13,000' MSL for 2-hours, you must...     

A.) Require that each passenger use oxygen   
B.) Be sure that all crew members use oxygen after the first hour    
C.) Have oxygen available for passengers, but they don't have to use it   
D.) What is this 13,000' of which you speak? I fly a Cub and rarely go higher than 1,300'.  
C.) Have oxygen available for passengers, but they don't have to use it. There is no requirement in Part 91 operations that passengers actually use oxygen; it only needs to be provided to them above 15,000’ (that’s why ‘A’ is incorrect). Only minimum flight crew (generally this means the pilot in all Part 91 ops) must use oxygen, and that is after 30-minutes between 12,500 to 14,000’ (MSL), and at all times above 14,000’ (MSL). That is why ‘B’ is incorrect. Answer ‘D’ is not really any kind of an answer, but is a good reason to go fly a Cub low and slow.

September 2011
The indicated airspeed at which an airplane stalls...     

A.) Will be the same no matter what the power setting or gross weight  
B.) Can be minimized by not banking   
C.) Can be minimized by staying coordinated (ball centered)  
D.) Increases exponentially during pull-up from a dive.

D.) Increases at the square of the load factor (g-force). Remember in any curved flight --- turns and pull-ups or dives --- the increased load factor results in a higher apparent weight that the wings must support and a higher indicated stall speed; the classic example of an Accelerated Stall. Answer A.) is only partially correct; stall speed changes (decreases) when the airplane is flown below maximum gross weight. B.) is somewhat correct relative to steep bank angles, but you won’t notice much difference indicated stall speed below 25-30 degrees of bank angle. And staying coordinated (especially when you’re close to stall speed!) is always a great idea, but it won’t effect the IAS that the plane stalls at, although being uncoordinated may cause one wing to stall before the other, creating an autorotation condition resulting in a spin. Whew! That was some quiz this month; I have to sit down and collect myself.

August 2011
what do the blue numbers on sectional charts, such as the 62 below, represent? 
A.) Highest terrain elevation in that quadrant
B.) Highest man-made obstruction (towers, antennas, etc.) in that quadrant 
C.) Both A & B; 6,200' AGL in this example 
D.) Both A & B; 6,200' MSL in this example.  
D.) MEF (Maximum Elevation Figures), shown in quadrangles bounded by ticked lines of latitude and longitude are represented in THOUSANDS and HUNDREDS of feet above MSL. The MEF is based on information available concerning the the highest known feature in each quadrangle, including terrain and obstructions (trees, towers, antennas, etc.) In the example above, 6,200’ MSL would be the highest known feature in that quadrangle.

July 2011
The stall warning buzzer does not work on your Cessna 172SP. Can you still (legally) fly the airplane VFR?  
 
A.) Yes    
B.) No
C.) Maybe   
B.) No; or, C.) Maybe. The Stall Warning buzzer is listed in the equipment list as ‘R’ and was required for FAA certification:
As the Stall Warning Buzzer is not part of required VFR equipment (91.205), and assuming there is not an MEL (Minimum Equipment List) for your Skyhawk, you can fly if you determine that the inoperative equipment does not constitute a hazard (91.213(d)(4)), and if you placard the non-working buzzer in the cockpit (91.213(d)(3)(i) & (ii)).

June 2011
IF BOTH PITOT AND STATIC PORTS ARE CLOGGED, YOUR AIRSPEED INDICATOR WILL... 

A.) Increase in a climb; decrease in a descent 
B.) Appear to be frozen
C.) Show ‘0’ for airspeed.   

B.) Appear to be frozen.
Airplane Flying Handbook, page 16-12: 
With pitot and (both) static ports clogged (usually due to icing), all airspeed, altimeter and VSI indications remain constant, regardless of actual changes in airspeed, altitude and vertical speed. 

May 2011
WHEN ENCOUNTERING BIRDS EN ROUTE, YOU SHOULD NORMALLY... 

A.) Turn your landing light on so they can see you 
B.) Climb to avoid collision 
C.) Descend aggressively at least 200'   

B.) Climb to avoid collision
AIM, 7-4-2 (d): 
When encountering birds en route, climb to avoid collision, because birds in flocks generally distribute themselves downward, with lead birds being at the highest altitude. (Ed. note: birds will normally descend; an exception being at low altitude, when they would climb to avoid a collision. This all assumes they see you at all).

April 2011
AFTER TAKEOFF, YOU SHOULD MAKE YOUR CROSSWIND TURN WHEN YOU...

Have no runway remaining
Can see Lowe’s under your right wing
Are within 300’ of traffic pattern altitude.

Within 300’ of traffic pattern altitude.  
AIM, 4-3-2 (c) (6): 
Departure leg. The flight path which begins after takeoff and continues straight ahead along the extended runway centerline. The departure climb continues until reaching a point at least 1/2 mile beyond the departure end of the runway and within 300 feet of the traffic pattern altitude.

March 2011
WHAT SERVICE IS PROVIDED BY EFAS (ENROUTE FLIGHT ADVISORY SERVICE)?

Preflight briefings
Closing flight plans
Hazardous weather advisories

Hazardous weather advisories. EN ROUTE FLIGHT ADVISORY SERVICE (EFAS)—A service specifically designed to provide, upon pilot request, timely weather information pertinent to the type of flight, intended route of flight and altitude. The FSSs providing this service are listed in the Airport/Facility Directory. Also known as Flight Watch.

February 2011
THE RADAR SUMMARY CHART SHOWS WHAT INFORMATION?

Significant turbulence and icing conditions
Direction of individual storm cell movement
Cloud locations and sizes

B. The radar summary chart shows the location, size, shape and intensity of areas of precipitation, as well as the direction of individual cell movement. Although the chart plots the locations of lines and cells of hazardous thunderstorms, it does not show cloud formations.

January 2011
SELECT THE TRUE STATEMENT REGARDING THE MAGNETIC COMPASS.

Magnetic fields within the airplane create magnetic variation.
Because of variation, the magnetic compass never points to true north.
The compass heading is the source used to set the gyroscopic heading indicator.

C. A is incorrect because variation is the difference between true north and magnetic north; deviation is the result of magnetic fields within the airplane. B is incorrect because at the Agonic Line, magnetic variation is indeed zero.